Archive | July, 2012

Six Sentence Sunday: July 29, 2012 #sixsunday

28 Jul

Happy Final-Sunday-in-July, Sixers!  This week I’m posting another six from my debut novel, The Mirrors at Barnard Hall.  This scene is a continuation of last week’s six from the first time Callista Franklyn sees a handsome stranger inside of her antique mirror.

{Synopsis: Callista Franklyn’s return to her family’s mansion in the English countryside stirs up more than memories of ghostly childhood friends when she discovers the very real, and very handsome, Nick Dalton in the reflection of her antique mirror.

The problem? Beyond the fact that he appears to reside in a mirror, historical records say Nick died in 1902.

Callista is intrigued by Nick’s claim that the year is 1902, so she investigates and uncovers a timeline of suspicious crimes and enchanted mirrors that connect her to the twentieth century. She also realizes that she’s falling for Nick, who is condemned to be murdered in August.

As the date of Nick’s impending death approaches, Callista must decide if she’s willing to risk changing history and erasing her place in the modern world in order to prevent the tragic crime and save the man she loves.}

* * *

“Perhaps you’ve suppressed the memory,” I suggested. 

He heaved a sigh, and I found myself wondering if ghosts needed to breathe or if it was simply a force of habit?

“If I am a ghost—which I am most certainly not—then you must be a ghost too.”

“I am not a ghost.”  That was the most ridiculous assumption I had ever heard.

“And what proof do you offer to justify such a statement?”

* * *

Intrigued?  The Mirrors at Barnard Hall is available on CreateSpace and Amazon (print for ONLY $9.99) and Amazon Kindle, Smashwords and Google Books (for only $2.99)!  Or you can start reading it HERE for FREE!!!!

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Interested in participating in Six Sentence Sunday?  Sign up on the website and post six sentences next Sunday! 

Check out some of the other FAB Authors HERE

Long Live the Queen!

25 Jul

This morning I received a notice from Amazon that I will receive my first Royalty payment on July 31st.  I’m sorry to report I won’t be an instant millionaire (much to my fiancée’s disappointment).  But the feeling of having something I’ve created become a “profitable” venture (I use this term in the loosest sense of the word… with all the money we’ve invested in The Mirrors at Barnard Hall it will be quite some time before we come close to breaking even) is pretty unbelievable.

PLEASE NOTE: All this talk of Royalties has prompted me to write these words with a fake British accent.  I trust you will read them with one as well.

Six Sentence Sunday: July 22, 2012 #sixsunday

21 Jul

This week I’m posting another six from my debut novel, The Mirrors at Barnard Hall.  This scene is a continuation of last week’s six from the first time Callista Franklyn sees a handsome stranger inside of her antique mirror.

{Synopsis: Callista Franklyn’s return to her family’s mansion in the English countryside stirs up more than memories of ghostly childhood friends when she discovers the very real, and very handsome, Nick Dalton in the reflection of her antique mirror.

The problem? Beyond the fact that he appears to reside in a mirror, historical records say Nick died in 1902.

Callista is intrigued by Nick’s claim that the year is 1902, so she investigates and uncovers a timeline of suspicious crimes and enchanted mirrors that connect her to the twentieth century. She also realizes that she’s falling for Nick, who is condemned to be murdered in August.

As the date of Nick’s impending death approaches, Callista must decide if she’s willing to risk changing history and erasing her place in the modern world in order to prevent the tragic crime and save the man she loves.}

* * *

Again, he shot me a you’re-not-right-in-the-head look; I fully—albeit silently—agreed.  “Because I haven’t died yet.”

“Maybe you forgot?”  My voice lacked the confidence necessary to convince my ghostly companion of his non-existence.

“Death does not seem the type of incident one would soon forget.  Not that I would know from personal experience, mind you,” he clarified.

* * *

Intrigued?  The Mirrors at Barnard Hall is available on CreateSpace and Amazon (print for ONLY $9.99) and Amazon Kindle, Smashwords and Google Books (for only $2.99)!  Or you can start reading it HERE for FREE!!!!

YOU CAN ALSO “LIKE” MY BOOK’S FANPAGE FOR A CHANCE TO WIN A FREE SIGNED COPY TO BE GIVEN AWAY ON JULY 24TH!!

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Interested in participating in Six Sentence Sunday?  Sign up on the website and post six sentences next Sunday! 

Check out some of the other FAB Authors HERE

Two Thumbs Up… or Down

20 Jul

Ah, the celebrated—and dreaded—reader reviews. 

Whether it is a book, a song, or a piece of artwork, when you place a chunk of yourself—one that you’ve slaved over for years—into the public eye for the masses to hate/celebrate, you will find yourself holding your breath to see how your work will be received by the public.  I believe we all have an illusion of grandeur when we write our first novels, firmly trusting that everyone is going to enjoy our stories. 

Good reviews are a phenomenal boost to one’s confidence and help justify the aforementioned illusion.  But the simple fact of the matter is: you can’t please everyone.  Perhaps your genre isn’t their cup-of-tea or your book happened to follow a NYT’s Best-Seller and isn’t as “racy” as its predecessor.  The first critical review can cut infinitely deeper than ten positive ones—and stay with you for a longer period of time. 

When that happens—and it will happen—my advice to you is this:  Accept reader reviews, positive and negative, as confirmation that people are actually spending their time and hard-earned money to purchase and read your book.  Gaining readership is over half the battle.  After all, people can’t like your work [or hate it] if they don’t read it.

 -Jenny

Eternal Editor

18 Jul

The other day I picked up my first book, The Mirrors at Barnard Hall, intent on tuning out my frantic wedding plans, getting lost in the story, and relishing the sense of accomplishment those words gave me.  Two chapters into the endeavor, my mind was so caught up in re-phrasing sentences and making minor tweaks to each page that the story lost its flow and cohesiveness.  I had to fight off the urge to grab a red pen from my desk drawer in order to apply the changes. 

For those of you who are seasoned authors, I pose this question to you:  Is it possible to read your own work and truly appreciate the story for what it has become? Or does the Eternal Editor that lives inside plague you every time you browse pages from one of your titles?

Six Sentence Sunday: July 18, 2012 #sixsunday

14 Jul

In honor of the official release of my debut novel, The Mirrors at Barnard Hall, my six this week is from that very book.  This scene is a continuation of last week’s post  from the first time Callista Franklyn sees a handsome stranger inside of her antique mirror. 

{Synopsis: Callista Franklyn’s return to her family’s mansion in the English countryside stirs up more than memories of ghostly childhood friends when she discovers the very real, and very handsome, Nick Dalton in the reflection of her antique mirror.

The problem? Beyond the fact that he appears to reside in a mirror, historical records say Nick died in 1902.

Callista is intrigued by Nick’s claim that the year is 1902, so she investigates and uncovers a timeline of suspicious crimes and enchanted mirrors that connect her to the twentieth century. She also realizes that she’s falling for Nick, who is condemned to be murdered in August.

As the date of Nick’s impending death approaches, Callista must decide if she’s willing to risk changing history and erasing her place in the modern world in order to prevent the tragic crime and save the man she loves.}

* * *

“If I may, I would like to point out one issue with your ghost theory,” the mysterious stranger said from the other side of the mirror.

“What is that?” I asked, attempting to conceal my interest. 

“Ghosts are usually dead.”  I nodded but remained silent; what tragedy had befallen this beautiful man?  “And I am very much alive.”

“How can you be so sure?”

           

* * *

Intrigued?  The Mirrors at Barnard Hall is available on CreateSpace and Amazon (print for ONLY $9.99) and Amazon Kindle, Smashwords and Google Books (for only $2.99)!  Or you can start reading it HERE for FREE!!!!

 ____________________________________________________________________________________________

Interested in participating in Six Sentence Sunday?  Sign up on the website and post six sentences next Sunday!  Check out some of the other FAB Authors HERE

 

Entitled

13 Jul

Although the word-count for the title of a work doesn’t come close to the number of words in the prose, the task of naming a manuscript can be equally, if not more difficult than writing the actual story.  One has to encompass the entire plot in a few words and entice potential readers to choose that book over millions of other stories. 

Granted, there are multiple other factors involved in attracting an audience: the synopsis on the back cover or jacket of the book, the cover design itself, and, surprisingly, even the author’s photograph. 

However, in my opinion, the TITLE still plays an enormous role in whether or not your work will draw people in or repel the masses.

But how do you come up with a title?  Unfortunately, I have yet to discover a magical formula or five-step process to titling one’s work.  My first book’s title, The Mirrors at Barnard Hall, stemmed from the fact that the entire premise is based on enchanted mirrors in a stately home in England.  For me, the title alludes at the mystery (What’s going on with the mirrors at this Barnard Hall place?) and the noble history associated with the setting (Barnard Hall sounds quite posh).

The title of my second book (a WIP), Flight Risk, is actually the title of a “song” the male-lead, Jaxon Lee, wrote about his first love, Evelyn Ryan.  It hints at tension (“risk”) and makes me think of an escaped convict. 

My third book’s title (another WIP), Semester of Thursdays, came from the fact that nearly every chapter takes place on a different Thursday during the course of a final semester in college. 

When attempting to conjure a reader-grabbing title for your work, my only piece of advice is this: when you have an idea, write it down. You don’t want that moment of brilliance to get lost in the millions of other words floating around in your head.